First big project: African Flower baby blanket

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When I first began to crochet I started with small projects – mostly facecloths – to practice my stitches and get my tension right. Once I was fairly confident that I could crochet something evenly and I had the hang of the basic stitches I was eager to get stuck into a big project. Conveniently I had a close friend who was having a baby so naturally I decided to make her a blanket. There were a few reasons I chose to make an African flower blanket:

  • I had seen them on Pinterest and they were super pretty!
  • They were made up of lots of small parts so it wasn’t too dissimilar to my previous projects
  • We weren’t to know the gender of the baby so I needed it to be gender neutral
  • I had lots of singular balls of baby yarn in different colours so the African Flower lent itself very well to being used with lots of different colours.

These blankets make wonderful yarn scrap blankets if you don’t mind them being a little eclectic in colour and can be made as large as you like, you just keep adding to it until you’re happy…. or out of yarn!

Crochet inspiration: African Flower baby blanket, hexagonal granny squares
Photo taken with the highest quality potato




Stash-Buster Link Party
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This project came in 3 parts: the granny square, the join and the border.

The Granny Square was created using this tutorial which was detailed enough for a beginner with helpful pictures to ensure you didn’t get it wrong. I used half flowers on 2 of the edges to ensure they would be straight.

The Join was a big challenge having never done a project that required any joining or seaming before. I decided to use the invisible seam method to join my squares because I wanted the different colours of the blanket to join up right against each other. This seam did seem to cause a bit of a ridged effect on the blanket (not to mention there was a lot of work involves sewing in many ends) and in retrospect I would probably crochet them together as I go or use some of the lovely joining methods you can find out there

The Border was something I added at the end, making it up as I went along until it looked pretty.

Row 1: DC around the entire edge of the blanket, doing 4 DCs on outer corners and skipping the 2 stitches on the inner corners.

Row 2: When on a corner (inner or outer): *DC ch1* x4 in the same stitch. Then Ch3 and in the middle stitch of the edge do: sc ch3 sc in same stitch. On the straight edges of the blanket do the big one on the edge of a flower and the little one in the middle.

Don’t worry about being perfect on the border, just do whatever works for you, you may find you need more or less stitches or you could just experiment and see what happens!

Now while I look back in fondness I found this project very challenging as a beginner and the amount of ends I needed to weave in led me to despair! In fact, after this blanket I didn’t crochet anything for 9 months!

In the end however, I couldn’t stay away! The hooks won out!

Want to see more inspiration projects like this?

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Comments

  1. Your project is lovely. I’m visiting from Stash Busting for February.

    1. thank you so much <3

  2. Absolutely lovely! Great idea to take so many colours – makes it look lively, happy and bright!

    1. Thank you 🙂 Because we didn’t know the gender of the baby I didn’t want to do anything beige or white so I thought I’ll use ALL the colours 😀

  3. Linda says:

    It’s beautiful, thank you for linking to the stash party. 🙂

    1. thank you very much, it’s been a lot of fun seeing other people’s projects x

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