Tutorial: Recycle Leftover Candles into Wax Melts!

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Hello guys, I’ve had a bit of a revamp of the blog over the last week! Have a look around and tell me what you think! Now today’s post is a great way to recycle leftover candles into something you can continue to use!

I’m a bit of a scent addict…. I love it when the house smells delicious! Wax burners, reed diffusers, scented candles, you name it there’s one in my house somewhere! I just love that feeling when you move into a new room and you’re hit with a brand new delicious smell! Combine this with my urge to never throw anything useful away and you end up with a box full of old ends of candles just waiting to end up on a wax burner!

Recently I’ve had a very annoying problem! You ever buy yourself a lovely big scented candle that just won’t burn? I had never come across one before until now but just take a look at this:

What the wick?!

Where on earth has my wick gone?! The candle burned lovely the first time and then the melted wax covered over the wick and boom! Gone. Useless! If you ever have had that problem, or you just want to use up those leftover corners from a used candle then read on!

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Recycle Candle Wax

Supplies Needed:

Leftover Candles (I should state that only scented candles will be useful for this particular tutorial)

Gloves or a tea towel to protect your hands

A microwave or pan of gently simmering water

A silicon mould tray (now you can use anything you like to shape your melts but I find the silicon tray is the easiest to use and get the melt out at the end, it’s probably wise not to use a mould that you want to use with food)




Options

In the case of the useless candle I originally thought I could save the candle: melt only the offending wax until the wick is useable again and try lighting it. This did not go to plan. As the jar heats up the wax melts from the outside, rather the top leaving me with hidden wick right up until the very end. On my next dud candle (because I’m sure this is not my last) I think I will try using a long match or candle lighter to carefully melt all the wax from the top and pour it off to reveal the wick. If anybody has tried this let me know how it went!

Whoever said I was messy?

When making your wax melts it’s entirely your choice on the shape or size of the melts you decide to make. You may only have 1 mould tray to hand in which case make the most of what you’ve got! Personally I prefer to make small melts: I have wax burners in varying sizes, one could take 2 yankee melts if I really wanted it to and another will only hold a sixth of one! Trust me when I say carving a sixth of a melt is a pain the behind! Not to mention messy, don’t waste precious crumbs! By making small melts I can portion accordingly: 5 melts over here, 1 melt over there, no wasting of precious smelly crumbs!

Melting the Wax

Melting the wax is fairly easy but wax does seem to evaporate when it gets hot so be nice and careful about it. If you’re using a pan please make sure you’re candle is in a heatproof container, I would hate for you to melt plastic all over your lovely pans! I mention this from experience when I didn’t realise a glass had a plastic cover on it and the plastic started melting! Not my finest upcycling moment….

So, as I was saying. Low heat, gently warming water. Sit your leftover candles in it and let it slowly melt.

Got a microwave? Give it 30 seconds to a minute at a time, less if it’s melting rather quickly. Keep checking on it, it really depends on the size of your candle. My candle was a large one and took a minute to get started and then 30 seconds at a time after that once the glass had heated up.

Making the Melts

Once some of your wax has melted use your gloves or tea towel to protect your hands and carefully pour it into your mould. Don’t wait until you have too much wax because firstly it will get too hot and start to evaporate and also it will be much harder to pour safely. Just enough for 1 melt is probably a good amount.

Be very careful!

As your candle gets lower be very careful if you are using the microwave. I’ve never had a problem with microwaving the metal base of the wick but once it starts to become visible you may wish to heat the rest on the hob, I would hate to be responsible for any exploding microwaves. Depends on whether or not you live dangerously!

….mind you, microwaving a candle wick is about as dangerously as I live.

Leave the melts to thoroughly cool, for at least an hour, before popping them out and storing them in a sealed container or bag for later!

Pretty shapes!

Then sit back and enjoy a lifetime supply of almost free wax melts!

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I’ve joined the Really Crafty Link Party:

 

Of course now that you’ve made your little melts you have a candle jar to do something with right? Well why don’t you check out my post on Removing Labels to prepare your jars and the browse my Glass Jar crafts Pinterest board for crafty inspiration!

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Comments

  1. Teresa says:

    I’m not much of a candle girl, but I do have a few stray leftover candles around the house. These wax melts would even make a nice gift, so I’ll have to give them a try. Thank you for sharing at The Really Crafty link Party this week. Pinned!

    1. yes, they would make a lovely gift 🙂 Thank you for hosting the party!

  2. angie says:

    what a great idea, love it and now I know what to do when the candle gets to where I can not use it any more
    come see us at http://shopannies.blogspot.com

    1. Thank you! I haven’t bought wax melts in forever! I’ll give you a visit <3

  3. Mommy says:

    they’re splendid honey bunny! pleased the moulds came in handy. also yeah you’re right you shouldn’t use them for food afterwards.

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